We need you now.These two young horses are cruelty seizures from Wyoming County, WV. They have been inside a barn and not out even once in two years. The owner admitted they only threw them hay or gave water now and and again in there. They loaded right up for volunteers Dorella and Amanda, though neither have been on a trailer before.

They are critical.

Please give your best gift toward their care at equinerescue@live.com via paypal or mail to Heart of Phoenix Equine Rescue PO BOX 81 Shoals, WV 25562

We are a 501(c)3 Organization of excellent reputation and a top rated Guidestar Charity. http://www.wvhorserescue.org/donate.html


  

Yesterday was one full of so many emotions. Truly.

While we were so fortunate to see amazing action from Wyoming county WV’s animal control officer by seizing two horses that are surely two of the most severe starvation and abuse cases we have ever known. . .

We also said goodbye to a sweet old soul unexpectedly.

“Friday”

He was almost at 30 days out from intake. He was a serious starvation case: a body score of one and almost 25-year-old at the best estimate. He was a neglect case from Lincoln county in West Virginia.

He was gentle and easy going in all ways.

This boy gave himself to people for years. It was evident in his manners and attitude.

Everything about him told that story. . . one of service and then abuse with little food.

He is a case that came to us when he was too old with too much neglect to overcome the disservice delt him, sadly.

He had a home waiting for him when he recovered, a sponsor and a whole team rooting from him, and suddenly, he went down.

My husband’s Mechanical company, Huntington Mechanical and Services, was out at Friday’s foster doing some plumbing work when he went down.

These boys worked for hours with us trying to get him up and stabilized, as did the barn crew at Sunday Stables (before anyone else even arrived), through the end.

It was really inspiring to see these men working who had no prior involvement with equine rescue (except my husband) pull together and work so hard to help this gelding.

In the end, he was tired and just could not.

We fed him apples in the last moments while we waited for the vet.

We talked to him and stroked his kind face. We told him how very sorry we were that his saving came in a different way than we had hoped.

And sorry, we were. So very sorry that life did not deal him a fair hand, and that we could not have came to him sooner.

I wish sweet Friday had been able to live the retirement mentioned in this poem below, but his last month has been one of love and leisure, and those are the last moments he will remember.

“The Old Brown Horse”

The old brown horse looks over the fence

In a weary sort of way.

He seems to be saying to all who pass:

“Well, folks, I’ve had my day-

I’m simply watching the world go by,

And nobody seems to mind,

As they’re dashing past in their motor-cars,

A horse who is lame and half-blind.”

The old brown horse has a shaggy coat,

But once he was young and trim,

And he used to trot through the woods and lanes

With the man who was fond of him.

But his master rides in a motor-car,

And it makes him feel quite sad

When he thinks of the days that used to be,
And of all the times they had.

Sometimes a friendly soul will stop

Near the fence, where the tired old head

Rests wearily on the topmost bar,

And a friendly word is said.

Then the old brown horse gives a little sigh

As he feels the kindly touch

Of a hand on his mane or his shaggy coat,

And he doesn’t mind so much.

So if you pass by the field one day,

Just stop for a word or two

With the old brown horse who was once as young

And as full of life as you.

He’ll love the touch of your soft young hand,

And I know he’ll seem to say

“Oh, thank you, friend, for the kindly thought

For a horse who has had his day.”

Author Uknown

The first photo of are the efforts to get him up. The next is of Friday about one week ago.


Under their very long winter coats, these two young horses are actually the thinnest we’ve encountered. . . .

It is hard to even grasp the condition without your hands on them. The photos do the conditions no justice, really.

As thin as V-Anna, Rowan and Scarlett. . .I wonder if the little mare isn’t actually worse.

A body score of one horse has no remaining fat, but these horses actually have large pockets of muscle missing.

They are skin hanging over bones with lots of hair, especially Violet.

They came from a criminal case in Wyoming County, WV.

The animal control officer did great job making sure we were able to be there to take them at seizure and by charging the owner.

They were, directly from the mouh of those handling the case, locked in the shanty type barn you see on the mountain side in some of these photos for two years. They were never let out during that time. They were in knee and belly deep manure.

The owner admitted to our team he sometimes threw hay in or gave water. Sometimes. Now and again.

And there they stood, waiting. . .in that building.

We would ask you give your best donation toward their care, please.

Know that donations are tax deductible.

http://www.wvhorserescue.org/donate.html

Heart of Phoenix Equine Rescue, INC is a 501(c)3 organization based in Appalachia.


  
  
  

Sunday and Friday

We’ve been very blessed for so many of our horses to fall under this lady’s care.

So many have been fortunate enough to have been the better for it.

This case would be harder than those before. . .harder because his condition was worse, because she is who personally hauled him from where he was living in squalor. . . because he was rehabbing from the start with her. . .because her staff at Sunday Stables would grow to love him over the next month and watch his smallest progress, remaining thrilled and hopeful.

When he went down, I guess we shouldn’t have been surprised . . . old and worn out with too little care for a long time before coming to the rescue.

And Susan Sunday and her tireless barn team worked from the early AM to try to help him find his legs, they cut up apples at the end when he let us know he could not make it, giving him water and letting him feel that in the last moments, a whole team of people cared very much for him.

The spot was selected on Sunday Stable’s land to bury Friday, and then once the grave dug. . .

They brought out a bale of hay to spread about for him to rest on. . .commenting on what a lovely spot was chosen and how the sunset was just as it should have been for burying such a grand old soul.

“Somewhere, somewhere

In time’s own space,

There must be some sweet pastured place….

Where creeks sing on and tall trees grow,

Some paradise where horses go.

For by the love that guides my pen,

I know great horses live again.”

– Author Unknown

For those of you that missed this darling Margarita update…

Thanks to all the folks who volunteered or donated paper and so forth for the Heart of Phoenix Equine Rescue booth at the mall on Monday and Wednesday


Tater Tot would love a home

petdetail

The Ball is fast approaching! We are so appreciative to those who are attending, have donated or sponsored and the volunteers who are making this happen.

It is poised to be such a fabulous evening!

A few updates:

*** If you have paid, which the vast majority have, your name is listed at the door for check in. If you haven’t paid, payment is due at check in at the door. If you have received a sponsored ticket, that is also listed at the door.

*** There are door prizes, so please make sure to get your ticket when you check in!

*** If you arrive and need a mask, let the volunteers know at the door. We have some for those who didn’t get one last minute.

*** A photographer will be waiting to do arrival shots before you are seated. There will also be a prop photo booth through the evening at various times, so visit her there, too!

*** One of the funniest moments of the evening will be the Dance Off. This is open to ANYONE attending. A $100 Visa Gift Card is the prize for the person, based on audience applause, who has the best move(s). This is a 15-20 second moment you get, should you accept this challenge, to win $100 bucks. Otherwise, spectators will get a show and are able to pick their favorite

*** We have well over 100 amazing, unique and custom Silent Auction items, including a lot of locally made art, so please remember to bring your checkbook. We also accept credit cards for auction items you win.

*** Ticket sales for the dinner portion are closed, but if you wish to attend following dinner, those tickets are at the door and $25 per person.

https://www.facebook.com/events/579041612231617/

HOW DO I RECOGNIZE A REPUTABLE RESCUE?

While there is no concrete definition of a great rescue group, there are some characteristics of successful ones that will help the public be able to effectively decide who they support.

Transparency/good customer service

A trustworthy rescue group readily shares information about their operations, experience and the animals in their care. They will share the exact costs of procedures and expenses. To the extent possible, they allow people to visit their facilities (obviously, not possible in a foster-based rescue group). These rescue groups are concerned with customer service for potential adopters, fosters and volunteers and are responsive to inquiries by returning phone calls and answering emails within a reasonable amount of time (even if just to acknowledge receipt of email and that they’re working on the request). Additionally, transparent rescue groups make their contact information (email address at minimum) easily accessible on their website.

Source of animals

Taking in animals from the streets, the public and local shelters are traditionally acceptable sources of animal intake, based on your organization’s mission, etc. Acquiring pets directly from breeders, dealers, or auctions, however, should be done more cautiously. By purchasing pets from an auction, for example, you may be inadvertently creating demand for dogs for sale, thus perpetuating the problem of puppy mills. If your rescue group acquires pets from bulk sources of pets, make sure you’re considering all of the ramifications, and avoid creating a situation where unscrupulous breeders are making a profit off your kindness.

Vet care

A conscientious rescue organization ensures that all of the animals in their care receive proper and timely veterinary care, which includes vaccines, spay/neuter, parasite testing and treatment and dental care, among others. Additionally, partnering with a veterinarian (or several), will have the added bonus of offering a reference who can vouch for the care and treatment the rescue group provides for its animals.

Humane care

In addition to adhering to the Association of Shelter Veterinarians’ Guidelines for Standards of Care in Animal Shelters, (which apply to animals in every type of setting, not just traditional shelters), rescue groups must ensure that their charges are receiving proper care – which includes all 5 Freedoms.

Honesty

At a well-run organization, individuals will inform volunteers as well as potential adopters and fosters about each animal’s problem, previous or ongoing treatment, and expectations about the level of care that may be required for a particular animal. At the same time, it’s important to keep a positive spin on the animal’s description. Instead of advertising a cat as “doesn’t get along with others”, another way to phrase it would be “prefers to have you all to herself.”

Follow up and return

A good rescue group will be readily available and responsive when the adopters and fosters come back with questions about their new pet and will offer help for behavior problems. As the goal is to keep pets in their home, it is a good idea to have behavior programs in place to prevent problems before they arise. But if necessary, a reputable rescue group will always take back the animal without question if the adopter wants to return it.

Essential Programs

Any rescue group that has its eye on longevity and long-term success should aim to implement the following programs…

Innovative, aggressive adoption program

In many communities, rescue groups unfortunately have a reputation for making it impossible for people to adopt a pet. Not only is this self-defeating in that it takes longer to get a pet into its new home, but it turns off potential adopters and creates more work for rescue groups. Rescue groups should work on creating an adoption process that uses an application to jump start non-judgmental conversations with potential adopters, rather than an application where the “wrong” answer is an automatic deal-breaker. The application process should be an opportunity to build relationships and share information. Also, rescue groups should create initiatives to help animals in the difficult-to-adopt categories (e.g., black cats, pit bull type dogs, seniors, special needs) get into homes.

A robust foster network

The larger the foster network, the more animals a rescue group can take in. Rescue groups should create a manual so that fosters know what they are getting into as well as provide protocols for common situations (medical issues, how to return an animal). Additionally, rescue groups should provide fosters with options and suggestions on how to get their charges adopted. If a foster feels like they have been abandoned, it will do a lot of damage to your rescue group’s reputation.

Volunteer recruitment program

As rescue groups operate almost entirely on a volunteer basis, there is going to be a constant influx and outflow of volunteers. Organizations should have a firm plan in place on which areas are most in need of volunteers (e.g., adoption events, operating a facility, transportation), how to train them and how to retain them.

Know your capacity

It’s easy to get overwhelmed – there are so many animals in need of our help. But we have to remember that we can’t save them all and need to do right by the ones we can save. Knowing when your organization is at or nearing full-capacity and being responsible about not taking in more animals is crucial to your rescue group’s longevity and reputation. Learning how to say no also helps prevent your organization from overextending itself financially and emotionally.

Community partnerships

Relationships within the community are going to be some of the most important resources for your rescue group. Talk to local pet stores and grocery stores for food donations, find your local clinic for low-cost spay/neuter, look for places where you can hold an adoption event every weekend and where can you advertise your organization and animals.

Funding

Every rescue group is always in need of additional funds. Create an event-planning committee for fundraisers, ask some of your staff to research and apply for grants, develop a public relations and advertising plan and think about ways to stretch each dollar as far as possible.

Extra Credit

Once your rescue group is well established in the community, think about building a coalition with other local shelters and rescue groups to address the pressing animal welfare issues in your community. Keep our common goals in mind as a way to build bridges with other organizations.

Rescue groups can help local shelters by reaching out to them and working with them on specific goals. Moreover, rescue groups can help each other just by setting a good example. It only takes one bad interaction to turn someone off to working with all rescue groups. By remaining professional, your organization can elevate the entire community. Finally, it’s important not to attack other rescue groups or shelters publicly. If all of us in the animal welfare community joined forces, just think what we could accomplish!

Merry Christmas from the lovely, adoptable Sophia!

It never ends. . .

This old Morgan gelding is headed to Heart of Phoenix right now.

He is, as you can see, extremely emaciated.

Sadly, one of our board members realized, upon hearing where he was located, she knew this lovely boy.

Many a child has shown him and won ribbons or learned to ride on him in lesson programs.

And this is how he ends up. . .

There is a reminder. . .when you sell a horse, KNOW where he goes and follow up, because no matter the pedigree, the performance and the disposition. . .

All horses are ONE Sale from Starvation, Slaughter or Horrific Abuse

This boy’s life will change, and there will be no more unknowns in his future.

Because Every Horse Deserves to be Part of Fairy Tale. . .

We will see he finally gets that Happily Ever After.

As you know, this isn’t the first urgent case we’ve take this week, so if you are able to donate, please do so now:

http://www.wvhorserescue.org/donate.html


It took him many years to get back to a barn he used to call home when he was there in training for some 10 or 15 years. . .

He knew it, too.

We got a message about a neglect case in the next county over. I called a HOP officer about picking him up. Come to find out, right before she got him, she found out this was a horse she trained for a client and had in her boarding barn for 10 or 15 years. He is now 26 and has been starved nearly to death. When he got to her barn tonight, he trotted in. He knew he was safe.


Arizona with one of her little girls in her adoptive home.

This picture is amazing.

So much of the time when a mule has suffered physical abuse, they become very dangerous because they are proactive about not being abused again.

Thankfully Arizona’s mind didn’t go this route. Though she has extreme fear issues, she has adopted flight instead if fight.

Frankly, we despaired of her ever being adopted.

But she met these two little girls and chose them as her people.

And that was all she wrote, folks. She found her happily ever after.

The masquerade ball was a blast last night and the venue was magnificent!

Look for more pictures later!

Ya’ll gotta plan to attend next year. Seriously.

Sophia is doing so well with Olivia Dixon in training

Emmy, the newest intake 😦

He is a senior Morgan Gelding. Please see his before photos from about 15 years ago.

He has, by a the Grace of God, come to Heart of Phoenix to be fostered by, who can believe it, the trainer who first worked with him for his original owners years ago. He lived in her barn for a decade or more and won blue ribbons all over the place. He fell into the wrong hands after a sale to what seemed a good home.

This is to remind everyone. . .EVERY SINGLE HORSE is one sale from starvation or the kill pen.


Mikey after a bath today.

By the Grace of God, we have unseasonably hot weather, and our VP and her family were able to scrub the filth off of this beautiful boy today.

I can see past the bones, if you can believe it, and see what he will look like in 6 months.

He will be a knock out.

As a reminder, he is a cruelty case from Wyoming County, WV

To donate toward his care, you can click the donate button this page or visit: http://www.wvhorserescue.org/donate.html

All donations are tax deductible.

Stayed tuned for updates on Mikey!


  

Violet during her bath today.

By the Grace of God, we have unseasonably hot weather, and our VP and her family were able to scrub the filth off of this little Gal.

As a reminder, she and Mikey are from a cruelty case in Wyoming County, WV

To donate toward her care, you can click the donate button this page or visit: http://www.wvhorserescue.org/donate.html

All donations are tax deductible.

Stayed tuned for updates on Violet!

(The embedded mess on her tail ended up needing to be cut away. It was impossible to remove without causing her tremendous pain and anxiety)

  

The Heart of Phoenix Equine Rescue “Merry Menagerie Masquerade Ball” was a tremendous success!

We sold out! 125 tickets. . .which was 25 more than we planned for originally!

Truly, we are thrilled at the amazing attendance and how awesome the evening turned out to be, thanks to our volunteers, donors and those who attended!

Thank you to Itty Bitty Kitty Committee for joining us to be part of this event.

Thank you to so many who made this evening a success!

Table Sponsors:

Arnett Carbis Toothman

Loftis Construction and Tyler Creek Farm

Best Electric

EAGLE Corp

Larry Waddell of Waddell Recycling in Elizabethtown, Kentucky
Our gorgeous Venue:

The Maylon House
The spectacular volunteer Choir:

River Magic Choir
Photographer:

Jessica Lee Cox
DJ Sponsor:

Harold B. Davis, CPA
Silent Auction Donations:

Linda Dunlap

Debra Sarkozy

Blenko Glass Company

Schneider’s Saddlery

Eddie Kagim

Flatcat Leather

Mardi Gras Casino & Resort

Beth’s Massage Hurricane

Tony Hardesty

Liz Elberink

Susan Sunday

Karen Wolfe

Circle M Farm Feed and Supply

Rocci’s Pool and Spa

Donohues’s Quick Lube, Gallipolis, OH

Roxy’s Furniture, Gallipolis, OH

Roxy’s Floors and More

The Feed Stop

Schrocks Home Furnishings & Village Heirlooms

Topes Fine Furniture

The Homeplace

Ion Clay Creations

Jessica Lee Cox

Enchanted Bath

Olivia Dixon – A Pony Named Satan Trainer

Kay’s Sweet Shop

Tina Neff-Legg

Hypnotic Hysteria

Andrea Gibson

Pauley’s Rowdy Acres

Valley Cash Feed Store

Stella & Dot

Kathy Cobb of Defining Moments

Equine Keepsakes by Aimee Cain

Also, Thank you to Senator Mark Maynard for attending. Sen. Maynard represents the district where Heart of Phoenix was “born,” you might say, and support from our legislators is so important, especially when so much of what we do hinges on the laws surrounding equine cruelty in West Virginia.

And all the volunteers who worked hard for months before and the day of, as well!

We plan to keep this theme and venue for next year, and we expect an even better turn out.

Ya’ll are all fabulous!


  
  

The Heart of Phoenix Equine Rescue “Merry Menagerie Masquerade Ball” was a tremendous success!

We sold out! 125 tickets. . .which was 25 more than we planned for originally!

Truly, we are thrilled at the amazing attendance and how awesome the evening turned out to be, thanks to our volunteers, donors and those who attended!

Thank you to Itty Bitty Kitty Committee for joining us to be part of this event.

Thank you to so many who made this evening a success!

Table Sponsors:

Arnett Carbis Toothman

Loftis Construction and Tyler Creek Farm

Best Electric

EAGLE Corp

Larry Waddell of Waddell Recycling in Elizabethtown, Kentucky
Our gorgeous Venue:

The Maylon House
The spectacular volunteer Choir:

River Magic Choir
Photographer:

Jessica Lee Cox
DJ Sponsor:

Harold B. Davis, CPA

Silent Auction Donations:

Linda Dunlap

Brenda Morning

Debra Sarkozy

Blenko Glass Company

Schneider’s Saddlery

Eddie Kagim

Flatcat Leather

Mardi Gras Casino & Resort

Beth’s Massage Hurricane

Tony Hardesty

Liz Elberink

Susan Sunday

Karen Wolfe

Circle M Farm Feed and Supply

Rocci’s Pool and Spa

Donohues’s Quick Lube, Gallipolis, OH

Roxy’s Furniture, Gallipolis, OH

Roxy’s Floors and More

The Feed Stop

Schrocks Home Furnishings & Village Heirlooms

Topes Fine Furniture

The Homeplace

Ion Clay Creations

Jessica Lee Cox

Enchanted Bath

Olivia Dixon – A Pony Named Satan Trainer

Kay’s Sweet Shop

Tina Neff-Legg

Hypnotic Hysteria

Andrea Gibson

Pauley’s Rowdy Acres

Valley Cash Feed Store

Stella & Dot

Kathy Cobb of Defining Moments

Equine Keepsakes by Aimee Cain

Andrea Gibson
Also, Thank you to Senator Mark Maynard for attending. Sen. Maynard represents the district where Heart of Phoenix was “born,” you might say, and support from our legislators is so important, especially when so much of what we do hinges on the laws surrounding equine cruelty in West Virginia.

And all the volunteers who worked hard for months before and the day of, as well!

We plan to keep this theme and venue for next year, and we expect an even better turn out.

Ya’ll are all fabulous!

Stitch yesterday!


Thank you so much for your continued support!